Jump to content or navigation.
Eranid Coordination of Research on illicit drugs Contact us

Searching information on drug research projects

This database contains information gathered in the course of the ERANID project during 2013 and 2014. Principally, it contains details of research projects on illicit drugs carried out since 2010 within the six ERANID countries and funded by the European Committee: Belgium; France; Italy; Portugal; The Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. However, this database will not capture all illicit drugs research carried out within a country.

62 projects matched the selected criteria:

Download as PDFDownload as PDF

Substance use, violence, and unintentional injury in young holidaymakers visiting Mediterranean destinations

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2008
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
Health treatment data provide useful information on the health issues faced by young tourists abroad and the burden these place on local resources. However, they provide no indication of the prevalence of violence or unintentional injury in holidaymakers, with only the most serious injuries resulting in hospital admission. To better understand the risks of injury in different destinations and factors associated with violence and unintentional injury in holidaymakers, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 6,502 British and German holidaymakers visiting five different Mediterranean destinations in the summer of 2009: Greece, Cyprus, Italy, Portugal, and Spain.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Unintentional injuries and interpersonal violence are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in young Europeans. Young people's alcohol and drug use increases during holidays. Despite strong associations between substance use and both violence and unintentional injury, little is known about this relationship in young people holidaying abroad. We examine how risks of violence and unintentional injury abroad relate to substance use and the effects of nationality and holiday destination on these relationships.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
European Commission Directorate-General for Justice
Summary references
Hughes, K., Bellis, M. A., Calafat, A., Blay, N., Kokkevi, A., Boyiadji, G., do Rosario Mendes, M. and Bajcàrova, L. (2011), Substance Use, Violence, and Unintentional Injury in Young Holidaymakers Visiting Mediterranean Destinations. Journal of Travel Medicine, 18: 80–89
Website
Published reference(s)
Hughes, K., Bellis, M. A., Calafat, A., Blay, N., Kokkevi, A., Boyiadji, G., do Rosario Mendes, M. and Bajcàrova, L. (2011), Substance Use, Violence, and Unintentional Injury in Young Holidaymakers Visiting Mediterranean Destinations. Journal of Travel Medicine, 18: 80–89
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

Visual versus written cues: a comparison of drug injectors’ responses. Have surveys using the written word underestimated risk behaviours for hepatitis C?

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2007
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The overall aim of this study was to assess whether IDUs provide different responses to questions about their sharing behaviour when asked using standard written questions (“written cues”) compared with video recordings which provide a visual demonstration of the behaviour in question (“visual cues”). Second, the study aimed to identify factors that discriminated between IDUs who said that they shared injecting equipment using written cues (irrespective of their responses to visual cues) and those who said they had shared when using visual cues only. The overall aim of this study was to assess whether IDUs provide different responses to questions about their sharing behaviour when asked using standard written questions (“written cues”) compared with video recordings which provide a visual demonstration of the behaviour in question (“visual cues”). Second, the study aimed to identify factors that discriminated between IDUs who said that they shared injecting equipment using written cues (irrespective of their responses to visual cues) and those who said they had shared when using visual cues only.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Hepatitis C is a global concern, with an estimated 123 to 170 million people worldwide chronically infected and three to four million people newly infected with the virus each year. In the United Kingdom and other Western countries, the main mode of transmission of the hepatitis C virus is through injecting drug use and associated practices; more specifically, through the sharing of used needles and syringes (“direct” sharing) and to a lesser degree through sharing other drug preparation or injecting equipment such as spoons and rinse water. In recent years, the enormity of the UK's epidemic has been evidenced through a number of sources, with the Health Protection Agency (HPA) consistently citing hepatitis C as the most significant infectious disease affecting those who inject drugs in the UK. Recent HPA estimates suggest that almost half of all injecting drug users (IDUs) have been infected with the virus and that the prevalence continues to rise.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Liverpool Drug and Alcohol Action Team, NHS Greater Glasgow
Summary references
Beynon CM, Taylor A, Allen E, Bellis MA. Visual Versus Written Cues: A Comparison of Drug Injectors’ Responses. Have Surveys Using the Written Word Underestimated Risk Behaviours for Hepatitis C? Substance Use and Misuse 2010 Aug;45(10):1491-508.
Website
Published reference(s)
Beynon CM, Taylor A, Allen E, Bellis MA. Visual Versus Written Cues: A Comparison of Drug Injectors’ Responses. Have Surveys Using the Written Word Underestimated Risk Behaviours for Hepatitis C? Substance Use and Misuse 2010 Aug;45(10):1491-508.
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

A Rapid Appraisal of Public Injecting Drug Use and Drug Related Litter in Southend-on-Sea

A Rapid Appraisal of Public Injecting Drug Use and Drug Related Litter in Southend-on-Sea
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Law enforcement responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use, Supply and markets, Methodology issues
Objectives
1. To understand the local nature of public injecting 2. To map public injecting locally 3. To provide harm reduction recommendations for reducing risk related to public injecting
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Criminology, Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
To explore the nature of public injecting practices and related risk
Performed by
Drug and Alcohol Research Unit, Plymouth University
Funded by
Drug and Alcohol Action Team - Southend-on-Sea
Summary references
Parkin, S. & Coomber, R. (2011) A Rapid Appraisal of Public Injecting Drug Use and Drug Related Litter in Southend-on-Sea, Essex. Southend-on-Sea Drug and Alcohol Action Team. University of Plymouth: Drug and Alcohol Research Unit
Website
Published reference(s)
Parkin, S. & Coomber, R. (2011) A Rapid Appraisal of Public Injecting Drug Use and Drug Related Litter in Southend-on-Sea, Essex. Southend Drug and Alcohol Action Team. University of Plymouth: Drug and Alcohol Research Unit
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

A Summary of the Health Harms of Drugs

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
This report summarises the health-related harms of emerging and established licit and illicit drugs, providing an update to Dangerousness of drugs: a guide to the risks and harms associated with substance misuse.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Commissioned by the National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse and the Department of Health, this report provides a summary for healthcare professionals of the harms to health arising from licit and illicit substance use. The health harms arising from licit and illicit substance use and misuse are wide-ranging and vary depending on the substance used and the pattern and context of their use, but it is well established that their use represents a major public health burden.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
NTA
Summary references
Jones. L., Bates. G., Bellis. M et al (2011). A Summary of the Health Harms of Drugs. Center for Public Health Publications.
Website
Published reference(s)
Jones. L., Bates. G., Bellis. M et al (2011). A Summary of the Health Harms of Drugs. Center for Public Health Publications.
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

At the Sharp End: A Pilot Investigation into the Health of Older Injecting Drug Users in Wirral

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
1. To quantify the number and proportion of injecting drug users aged 50 and over accessing agency based needle and syringe programmes in Wirral. 2. To establish whether the proportion of injecting drug users aged 50 and over accessing agency based needle and syringe programmes in Wirral has changed between 1992 and 2010. 3. To identify the proportion of injecting drug users aged 50 and over in contact with agency based needle and syringe programmes who are reported in structured drug treatment, and compare this to the proportion of younger injectors reported in treatment. 4. To identify self-reported health-related issues faced by older injectors and other aspects of their lives which impact upon their health. 5. To examine the feasibility of using a review of the medical notes of injectors to ascertain their healthcare in relation to: blood borne viruses, blood pressure, drug screening, cardiac function, kidney function and liver function. 6. To increase awareness of the needs of older injectors amongst individuals who work across health services in Wirral.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
European estimates suggest that between 2001 and 2020 the number of people aged 65 and over with a substance abuse problem or needing treatment for an abuse disorder will more than double. Evidence for this demographic change in the UK has been demonstrated using established monitoring systems. Monitoring of drug treatment now occurs on a national basis and the most recent data for the North West shows that the percentage of the treatment population aged 40 and over in 2009/10 had risen. Across England and Wales, the North West's drug treatment population is relatively old, and Wirral has the highest median age (39 years) of the in treatment population in the North West. Therefore, issues relating to age such as those being experienced in Wirral, are likely to affect other areas in the future. Research conducted in Cheshire and Merseyside has also demonstrated the existence of older injecting drug users. Older drug users experience significant health challenges as they age, and die earlier than non drug users from a range of causes over and above those specifically categorised as constituting a drug related death.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Wirral DAAT
Summary references
Beynon, C and Baron L (2011). At the Sharp End: A Pilot Investigation into the Health of Older Injecting Drug Users in Wirral. Center for Public Health Publications.
Website
Published reference(s)
Beynon, C and Baron L (2011). At the Sharp End: A Pilot Investigation into the Health of Older Injecting Drug Users in Wirral. Center for Public Health Publications.
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

Cost Benefit Analysis of Drug Treatment Services for Young People

Cost Benefit Analysis of Drug Treatment Services for Young People
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2008
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
There are two main elements of the study: understanding the amount that is spent in total and per person on specialist drug and alcohol services for young people in 2008-09; estimating and valuing the benefits of young people’s drug and alcohol treatment - measured as a reduction in the economic and social costs of drug and alcohol misuse.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Economy, Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Young people with substance misuse problems, if not treated, may experience drug-related problems as adults, i.e. they may become long-term problematic drug users (PDUs) or recreational drug users (RDUs) or heavy drinkers. This project seeks to assess both the short and long term benefits of treating young people (essentially avoiding negative outcomes) with the costs of treatment services.
Performed by
Department for Education
Funded by
Department for Education
Summary references
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/197952/DFE-RB087.pdf
Website
Published reference(s)
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/specialist-drug-and-alcohol-services-for-young-people-a-cost-benefit-analysis
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

Evaluation of Jobcentre Plus Intensive Activity Trial

Evaluation of Jobcentre Plus Intensive Activity Trial
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
The trial was designed to help improve the service delivered to substance misusing customers, to further develop partnership working between treatment providers and Jobcentres and to increase the level of voluntarily referrals made by Jobcentre Plus to a treatment provider.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Predominantly process evaluation of a small-scale trial conducted in three Jobcentres involving closer working with local treatment providers with the aim of increasing the number of customer disclosures of substance misuse to JCP, and the number of referrals of substance misusers by JCP to a treatment provider.
Performed by
Department for Work and Pensions
Funded by
Summary references
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evaluation-of-the-jobcentre-plus-intensive-activity-trial-in-house-research-no-2
Website
Published reference(s)
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evaluation-of-the-jobcentre-plus-intensive-activity-trial-in-house-research-no-2
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

HELPER Programme (Substance Misuse)- A phase-specific psychological therapy for people with problematic cannabis use following a first episode of psychosis (ReCAP)

HELPER Programme (Substance Misuse)- A phase-specific psychological therapy for people with problematic cannabis use following a first episode of psychosis (ReCAP)
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Mechanism of drug use and effects
Objectives
We are conducting an exploratory trial to evaluate trial to evaluate whether a psychological therapy following a first episode of psychosis is effective at reducing cannabis use when compared to usual care. This study will also investigate whether a brief intervention (4.5mths) is as effective as a longer one (9mths. This is a randomised controlled trial with 3 treatment groups, long-term treatment, short-term treatment, and treatment as usual.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Performed by
Lancashire Care NHS Trust
Funded by
NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

Substance Use among 15-16 year olds in the UK - ESPAD in the UK

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
This briefing presents a focussed summary of key results for the UK from the 2011 survey that was undertaken on behalf of the UK by the Centre for Public Health. It should be read alongside the full ESPAD report (see www.espad.org). The 2011 ESPAD survey has provided important information about the extent of substance use among 15-16 year olds in the UK and how these have changed over the last 16 years. The survey provides intelligence to assist with the design and targeting of interventions that support healthy adolescent development, as well as for monitoring the impact of national policies.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The European Survey Project on Alcohol and Drugs (ESPAD) is conducted every four years and collects comparable data on trends in substance use among 15-16 year old school pupils across Europe. It is a high quality survey and provides important data to support policy, practice and research. In 2011 36 countries and around 100,000 students took part; with 1712 being from the UK. The UK has taken part in ESPAD since it began in 1995, and the survey is now in its fifth data collection stage.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health
Funded by
Alcohol Research UK
Summary references
Atkinson. A., Sumnall. H., Bellis, M. (2012). Substance Use among 15-16 year olds in the UK. Findings from ESPAD.
Website
Published reference(s)
Atkinson. A., Sumnall. H., Bellis, M. (2012). Substance Use among 15-16 year olds in the UK. Findings from ESPAD.
Download as PDFDownload as PDF

Taking Drugs Seriously: Controlling New Drugs

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2011
Area(s) of research
Law enforcement responses, Harm reduction responses, Determinants of drug use, Methodology issues
Objectives
This project aimed to re-examine and re-evaluate the ways the UK seeks to control drugs through the lens of new synthetic substances such as legal highs. By combining a review of international approaches with a series of ‘soft systems’ workshops with key national stakeholders, it sought to envisage and explore the different options for the framework of drugs control.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
History, Sociology, Other discipline
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The proliferation of new psychoactive substances, or ‘legal highs’, has caused moral panic in recent years. But it has also thrown the existing regulatory measures for drugs into sharp relief . As quickly as policymakers seek to control new substances through the Misuse of Drugs Act, others are being manufactured and put on the market. The effects of these new substances are unknown and untested and it is this uncertainty combined with easy accessibility that presents major challenges to public safety. However, these challenges also provide an opportunity to look again at drug control policy without a rerun of redundant debates about whether to be ‘tough’ or ‘soft’ on drugs. Instead, this research has sought to bring a systems approach to the consideration of this 'wicked issue' in order to identify a new approach that seeks out areas of agreement rather than dispute in order to identify new approaches that might be successful in dealing with the new challenges posed by these new drugs.
Performed by
UK Drug Policy Commission
Funded by
ABC Charitable Trust, Esmee Fairbairn Foundation
Summary references
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/demos-ukdpc-legal-highs/
Website
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/demos-ukdpc-legal-highs/
Published reference(s)
Birdwell, J., Chapman, J. & Singleton, N. (2011) Taking Drugs Seriously: a Demos and UK Drug Policy Commission report on legal highs. London: Demos http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Policy-report-Taking-drugs-seriously-a-Demos-and-UKDPC-report-on-legal-highs.pdf Reuter P. (2011) Options for regulating new drugs: a review of recent experience. London:UKDPC http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/options-regulating-new-psychoactive-drugs-a-review-recent-experience/ Birdwell J. & Singleton, N. (2011) "Forty years on: time for a new approach to drug control?" Criminal Justice Matters, 84 (1), 32-34. King, L.A., Nutt, D., Singleton, N. & Howard, R. (2012) Analogue Controls: an imperfect law. London: UKDPC & ISCD.
Although every reasonable effort is made to present accurate information, ERANID makes no guarantees of any kind and cannot be held liable for any incorrect information or external hyperlinks.

ERANID

Direct access to: