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Searching information on drug research projects

This database contains information gathered in the course of the ERANID project during 2013 and 2014. Principally, it contains details of research projects on illicit drugs carried out since 2010 within the six ERANID countries and funded by the European Committee: Belgium; France; Italy; Portugal; The Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. However, this database will not capture all illicit drugs research carried out within a country.

62 projects matched the selected criteria:

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Families of drug users: policies & practice across the UK

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2012
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The project aimed to provide services and commissioners at both local and national levels with information on gaps in provision and models for developing improved services for adult family members of people with drug problems. More specifically it aimed to: • describe the current level of focus on adult family members of people with drug problems within relevant strategies, guidance and planning documents at both national and local level; • map the extent and nature of current provision for adult family members of people with drug problems across the UK, including services providing support for family members in their own right as well as their involvement in services providing treatment to their relative; • identify and describe models of good practice.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Other discipline
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Families affected by a relative's drug problem have been largely neglected in drug policy and where their needs have been acknowledged the focus has largely been on the children of people with drug problems. Previous research commissioned by the UKDPC reviewed the evidence concerning the impact on adult family members of a relative’s drug use. This showed the large numbers likely to be affected in this way and the high costs borne by adult family members affected by a relative’s drug use and the value of the harms they experience and of the support they provide. It also reviewed the evidence concerning the type of support they need, both in their own right and in order to support their relative to recover, and effective ways this can be provided. However, little is known about the extent and nature of support provision provided to this group nor of the extent to which they are effectively engaged in treatment services where appropriate. This research therefore sought to review current provision to highlight gaps and raise awareness of the needs of this group.
Performed by
UK Drug Policy Commission
Professor Alex Copello, University of Birmingham and Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust
Funded by
Pilgrim Trust, Scottish Families Affected by Drugs, Adfam
Summary references
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/the-forgotten-carers/
Website
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/the-forgotten-carers/
Published reference(s)
Copello, A. & Templeton, L. (2012) The Forgotten Carers: Support for adult family members affected by a relative’s drug problems. London:UKDPC http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/the-forgotten-carers-support-for-adult-family-members-affected-by-a-relatives-drug-problems-.pdf Copello, A., Templeton, L., Chohan, G. & McCarthy, T. (2012) Supporting adult family members of people with drug problems in Scotland. London: UKDPC http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/supporting-adult-family-members-of-people-with-drug-problems-in-scotland1.pdf Templeton, L. & Copello, A. (2012) Adult Family Members Affected by a Relative’s Substance Misuse: A Review of Policy and Guidance Documents across the UK. London:UKDPC http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/adult-family-members-affected-by-a-relative’s-substance-misuse-a-review-of-policy-and-guidance-documents-across-the-uk.pdf Copello, A. & Templeton, L. (2012) Adult Family Members Affected by a Relative’s Substance Misuse: A UK-wide survey of services for adult family members. London: UKDPC http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/adult-family-members-affected-by-a-relative’s-substance-misuse-a-uk-wide-survey-of-services-for-adult-family-members.pdf Copello, A., Templeton, L., Chohan, G. & McCarthy, T. (2012) Adult Family Members Affected by a Relative’s Substance Misuse: Qualitative Interviews with Commissioners and Service Providers in England and Scotland. London: UKDPC. http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/adult-family-members-affected-by-a-relative’s-substance-misuse-qualitative-interviews-with-commissioners-and-service-providers-in-england-and-scotland.pdf
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Mapping and Exploration of Drug Markets in Southend-on-Sea

Mapping and Exploration of Drug Markets in Southend-on-Sea
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2012
Area(s) of research
Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Law enforcement responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use, Supply and markets
Objectives
To map problem drug markets and to ascertain risks related to drug market supply in Southend-on-Sea and to assuage unhelpful local media coverage. To better understand the local drug market/s
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Criminology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
To have a better understanding of the ways that the local drug market impacts on risks for problem drug users
Performed by
Drug and Alcohol Research Unit, Plymouth University
Funded by
Drug and Alcohol Action Team - Southend on-Sea
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
Coomber, R. and Moyle, L. (2012) A Rapid Appraisal of the Illicit Drug Market in Southend-on-Sea, Essex. Full Report. Plymouth University, Drug and Alcohol Research Unit (August).
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Perceptions of food choices of people aged 50 and over in contact with a specialist drug service: a pilot qualitative interview study

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2012
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The aim of this study was to undertake a pilot investigation into how older people in contact with a specialist drug service perceive their diet and what influences their decisions about the food they choose. More specifically, the study aimed to describe the diets of 10 clients attending a specialist drug service, how they rated their diet and what factors affected the foods they consumed. We also aimed to identify whether body mass was considered part of their care planning activities. In this study, older is defined as 50 and over; we can think of people in their fifties as entering old age, where the focus of health and social policy is on promoting and extending a healthy and active life.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The number of people who use illicit drugs as they age is rising; older drug treatment patients experience a range of long-term conditions at a young age. Diet is important for healthy ageing; ensuring that an older person’s diet meets minimum dietary requirements is a valuable intervention. To date, no investigation into the diet and nutrition of older drug users has occurred, nor indeed is it clear whether drug services that support older people consider this issue as part of care planning activities.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Summary references
Beynon. C., Baron. L and Hackett. A. (2013). Perceptions of food choices of people aged 50 and over in contact with a specialist drug service: a pilot qualitative interview study. Journal of Substance Use, 2012; Early Online:, 1–9.
Website
Published reference(s)
Beynon. C., Baron. L and Hackett. A. (2013). Perceptions of food choices of people aged 50 and over in contact with a specialist drug service: a pilot qualitative interview study. Journal of Substance Use, 2012; Early Online:, 1–9.
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Preventing Substance Misuse: Randomised Controlled Trial of the Strengthening Families 10-14 UK Programme

Preventing Substance Misuse: Randomised Controlled Trial of the Strengthening Families 10-14 UK Programme
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2012
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses
Objectives
Project SFP Cymru is the first comprehensive evaluation of the SFP to be carried out in the UK. It aims to examine whether the programme delays or reduces substance use. The research will ascertain the impact of the SFP10-14UK on preventing alcohol and drug misuse, and smoking behaviour in adolescents.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The use of alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs by young people impacts on their health in the short and long term, and is associated with antisocial behaviour, crime and drop out from school. Many risk and protective factors for substance misuse in young people are located in the family. The Strengthening Families 10-14 UK programme aims to strengthen areas of family life that protect against substance misuse (parenting, communication, and young people’s resilience skills).
Performed by
Cardiff University School of Medicine
Funded by
Medical Research Council, Welsh Assembly
Summary references
Website
http://www.projectsfpcymru.co.uk/en/content/cms/home/
Published reference(s)
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Script in a day for injecting drug users: feasibility trial.

Script in a day for injecting drug users: feasibility trial.
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2012
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
The study will inform the best way to carry out a larger multi-centre study, including whether accelerated access to OST enhances treatment rates; the acceptability of using BDP workers for this; and how feasible it is to conduct this type of study. If effective it will be replicable across England.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Heroin injecting causes serious chronic health problems. Engaging injecting heroin users in Opiate Substitution Treatment (OST) and needle & syringe programmes is important in protecting drug users from Hepatitis C(HCV) transmission. Provisional UK data suggest that the combination of interventions is most effective at reducing HCV. OST reduces the risk of fatal overdose, drug related crime and is highly cost effective. Needle & syringe programmes and OST are widely available in Bristol. Needle exchange is provided through Bristol Drugs Project (BDP) and 24 pharmacies. OST is provided by 80% of Bristol GPs; waiting times from acceptance into treatment by a GP to starting OST are low (4 days in 2009). Despite many injecting drug users being engaged with needle exchange, 42% were not currently in OST in 2009. Key barriers to OST include mythology and fears about treatment and perceived and real access problems, particularly in making and attending a GP appointment.This study seeks to address these problems by accelerating access to OST. BDP case workers will offer drug users the opportunity to get OST within the day. The case worker will phone the study GP surgery on the patient’s behalf and accompany them to the appointment. The GP will assess the patient and initiate treatment. The patient will receive supervised OST, and a prescription to obtain further supervised OST at a convenient pharmacy. After 21 days they will be transferred back to their registered GP to continue OST in line with Government guidance. The control group will receive current usual care (information, encouragement and free telephone access to make a GP appointment).
Performed by
Bristol Primary Care Trust
Funded by
NIHR Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB)
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Service provision for people with mental health and substance misuse problems - the relationship between stigma and social exclusion

Service provision for people with mental health and substance misuse problems - the relationship between stigma and social exclusion
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2012
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The overall aim of the research was to inform the development of the co-occurring mental health and substance misuse agenda by exploring perceptions around stigma and social exclusion from the perspectives of statutory and third sector organisations and people with mental health and substance misuse problems.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The Welsh Assembly Government recognises that issues around stigma, discrimination and social inclusion are closely linked in the area of mental health and substance misuse (WAG, 2005; 2008).
Performed by
Bangor University
Funded by
NISCHR
Summary references
http://www.cfmhas.org.uk/research/
Website
Published reference(s)
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Drug Combined Monitoring Service 2012/2013

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
To Collect coroner information on drug related deaths and match with information from other databases held within CPH in order to build up a picture of each death. To use current data collection tools to understand and demonstrate the key characteristics of drug treatment successes in relation to intervention and client characteristics that help contribute to the Drug Treatment Intelligence. ATMS collects data on a monthly basis and transfers information through a secure file transfer protocol, validated and analysed to produce local level reporting on a monthly, quarterly and annual basis. Over all helps to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of alcohol interventions, care pathways and treatment journeys. To provide accurate figures for people in treatment with HIV, allowing effective allocation of resources, supporting new payment by results systems, together with longitudinal data to identify trends and enable forecasts. The purpose of the TIIG ISS is to enable systematic data collection, sharing and use, with the aims of: enabling the identification and monitoring of trends in intentional and unintentional injuries; assisting local partners (e.g. health services) on injury intelligence; enhancing ED datasets to support local public health priorities; informing injury prevention strategies through needs assessment; providing a more sophisticated evaluation of the impact of interventions; identifying at risk groups; and, providing the opportunity to benchmark. The IAD collects attributable data from (both agency-based and pharmacy-based) Needle and Syringe Programmes (NSP), the National Probation Service, Connexions and a range of additional tier 2 drugs services. To produce monthly reports outlining performance, details outcomes such as treatment attendance, reasons for case closures and representation and continues to work with DIP teams to ensure that data quality is high.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Objectives (native)
• Collect coroner information on drug related deaths and match with information from other databases held within CPH in order to build up a picture of each death. • Use current data collection tools to understand and demonstrate the key characteristics of drug treatment successes in relation to intervention and client characteristics that help contribute to the Drug Treatment Intelligence. • ATMS collects data on a monthly basis and transfers information through a secure file transfer protocol, validated and analysed to produce local level reporting on a monthly, quarterly and annual basis. Over all helps to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of alcohol interventions, care pathways and treatment journeys. • Provides accurate figures for people in treatment with HIV, allowing effective allocation of resources, supporting new payment by results systems, together with longitudinal data to identify trends and enable forecasts. • The purpose of the TIIG ISS is to enable systematic data collection, sharing and use, with the aims of: enabling the identification and monitoring of trends in intentional and unintentional injuries; assisting local partners (e.g. health services) on injury intelligence; enhancing ED datasets to support local public health priorities; informing injury prevention strategies through needs assessment; providing a more sophisticated evaluation of the impact of interventions; identifying at risk groups; and, providing the opportunity to benchmark. • The IAD collects attributable data from (both agency-based and pharmacy-based) Needle and Syringe Programmes (NSP), the National Probation Service, Connexions and a range of additional tier 2 drugs services. • To produce monthly reports outlining performance, details outcomes such as treatment attendance, reasons for case closures and representation and continues to work with DIP teams to ensure that data quality is high.
Initial identified needs
The Drug Related Deaths Monitoring System and the Enhanced Deaths Monitoring Service managed by CPH receives information from across Merseyside on People who die from a death classified a drug related. Together these two systems provide a mechanism for reviewing deaths of drug users in order to ascertain lessons learnt and remedial actions, and provide a comprehensive assessment of mortality among drug users. • The CPH develops and implements methodologies to monitor and predict the nature of drug treatment outcomes across and within specific populations. It has established a system which will enable the rapid response to commissioner information and intelligence demands in relation to analysis and reporting of drug treatment outcomes. • The GOLIATH NSTMS (Non Structured Treatment Monitoring System) was set up to capture activity via the bespoke GOLIATH database, covering areas such as wellbeing, substance use and referrals to other organisations. • The Alcohol Treatment Monitoring System (ATMS) captures attributable information in relation to demographics, alcohol use, interventions and outcomes on individuals presenting to tier 2 alcohol treatment services. The ATMS is an essential element in providing a detailed picture of the public health impact and response to alcohol at a Cheshire and Merseyside level. • HIV is a costly condition, and good quality epidemiological and service use data are required to invest limited prevention and treatment resources for maximum effect. The HIV intelligence in the North West provided by the CPH provides commissioners and public health professionals with access to PCT level data via interactive web tables, annual reports and bespoke data requests. • The Trauma and Injury Intelligence Group (TIIG) was established to look at access to quality and reliable injury information. Through establishing an Injury Surveillance System (ISS) routine data collection of intentional and unintentional injury data from a range of agencies including emergency departments, and the ambulance, fire and police services is carried out. • The Inter Agency Drug Misuse Database (IAD) was established in partnership with the Drug (and Alcohol) Action Teams in 1997 to support the need for local information on drug use. This system helps provides a comprehensive picture of drug use across Cheshire and Merseyside, identifying emerging issues and supporting the needs assessments and treatment planning processes. • Providing performance management, data processing and analysis regarding the delivery of Drug Intervention Programmes (DIP), to ensure that the delivery of DIP has been accurately represented and commissioners have been provided with a variety of information to assist their understanding of the DIP client group and the impact of the scheme.
Initial identified needs (native)
• The Drug Related Deaths Monitoring System and the Enhanced Deaths Monitoring Service managed by CPH receives information from across Merseyside on people who die from a death classified a drug related. Together these two systems provide a mechanism for reviewing deaths of drug users in order to ascertain lessons learnt and remedial actions, and provide a comprehensive assessment of mortality among drug users. • The CPH develops and implements methodologies to monitor and predict the nature of drug treatment outcomes across and within specific populations. It has established a system which will enable the rapid response to commissioner information and intelligence demands in relation to analysis and reporting of drug treatment outcomes. • The GOLIATH NSTMS (Non Structured Treatment Monitoring System) was set up to capture activity via the bespoke GOLIATH database, covering areas such as wellbeing, substance use and referrals to other organisations. • The Alcohol Treatment Monitoring System (ATMS) captures attributable information in relation to demographics, alcohol use, interventions and outcomes on individuals presenting to tier 2 alcohol treatment services. The ATMS is an essential element in providing a detailed picture of the public health impact and response to alcohol at a Cheshire and Merseyside level. • HIV is a costly condition, and good quality epidemiological and service use data are required to invest limited prevention and treatment resources for maximum effect. The HIV intelligence in the North West provided by the CPH provides commissioners and public health professionals with access to PCT level data via interactive web tables, annual reports and bespoke data requests. • The Trauma and Injury Intelligence Group (TIIG) was established to look at access to quality and reliable injury information. Through establishing an Injury Surveillance System (ISS) routine data collection of intentional and unintentional injury data from a range of agencies including emergency departments, and the ambulance, fire and police services is carried out. • The Inter Agency Drug Misuse Database (IAD) was established in partnership with the Drug (and Alcohol) Action Teams in 1997 to support the need for local information on drug use. This system helps provides a comprehensive picture of drug use across Cheshire and Merseyside, identifying emerging issues and supporting the needs assessments and treatment planning processes. • Providing performance management, data processing and analysis regarding the delivery of Drug Intervention Programmes (DIP), to ensure that the delivery of DIP has been accurately represented and commissioners have been provided with a variety of information to assist their understanding of the DIP client group and the impact of the scheme.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Wirral PCT, Liverpool PCT, Cheshire
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Drug-related deaths analysis

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
To establish if there is a protective effect of treatment in relation to overdose To explore if there are particular peak times of risk (as has been identified in other literature) To identify the factors which appear to increase risk and the actions that can be taken to reduce risk
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Objectives (native)
- To establish if there is a protective effect of treatment in relation to overdose - To explore if there are particular peak times of risk (as has been identified in other literature) - To identify the factors which appear to increase risk and the actions that can be taken to reduce risk
Initial identified needs
Project is required to better understand the detail of drug-related deaths than is possible through published statistics, and to explore the potential effect of treatment on likelihood of drug-related death
Performed by
Alcohol and Drugs Team, Public Health England
Funded by
Public Health England
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Early Warning System 2012/2013

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Mechanism of drug use and effects, Supply and markets
Objectives
To operate an Early Warning System (EWS) to assist in the implementation of European Council Decision 2005/387/JHA of 10 May 2005 on the information exchange, risk assessment and control of new psychoactive substances. The purpose is to co-ordinate the implementation of the EWS on behalf of the UK Focal Point and to be responsible for providing a range of information to the EMCDDA on the identified substances and distributing this information across the UK.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Pharmacology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Every Member State of the EU is required, under a EU Regulation, to have a National Focal Point on Drugs. The Focal Point is required to report information on the national drug situation to the European Monitoring Centre on Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). An Early Warning System (EWS) on New Psychoactive Substances was established and while the main focus concerns ‘new psychoactive substances’ as defined in the 2005 Council Decision, the EWS also, occasionally, receives and generates information on established drugs where there are unusual circumstances (e.g. glass in cannabis, anthrax spores in heroin, unusual adulterants, very large seizures etc).
Performed by
The Centre for Public Health
Funded by
Department of Health
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Estimates of the Prevalence of Opiate and/or Crack Cocaine Use

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses
Objectives
As above To understand the scale of use and to establish treatment penetration, and also to satisfy EMCDDA reporting.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Objectives (native)
As above - to understand the scale of use and to establish treatment penetration, and also to satisfy EMCDDA reporting.
Initial identified needs
The prevalence estimates have been produced for a number of years in order to gauge the scale of problematic opiate and crack cocaine use as well as injecting behaviour. This is used to calculate the proportion of users who are in treatment and how this varies by area, gender and age. The estimate also contributes to the EMCDDA's PDU indicator
Performed by
Public Health England
Liverpool John Moores University
Glasgow Prevalence Estimation Ltd
University of Manchester
Funded by
Public Health England
Summary references
Website
http://www.nta.nhs.uk/facts-prevalence.aspx
Published reference(s)
Although every reasonable effort is made to present accurate information, ERANID makes no guarantees of any kind and cannot be held liable for any incorrect information or external hyperlinks.

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