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Searching information on drug research projects

This database contains information gathered in the course of the ERANID project during 2013 and 2014. Principally, it contains details of research projects on illicit drugs carried out since 2010 within the six ERANID countries and funded by the European Committee: Belgium; France; Italy; Portugal; The Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. However, this database will not capture all illicit drugs research carried out within a country.

62 projects matched the selected criteria:

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Evaluation of The Quays project, Wirral, Merseyside

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses
Objectives
A logic model was developed in collaboration with The Quays Management Committee to outline the impacts and outcomes of the project, which informed the evaluation design.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Drug and alcohol misuse is a key public health issue, with evidence regarding the associated health risks well documented. Support services during recovery have been identified as key to the maintenance of abstinence and a healthy and productive life. Recently, the UK Government has identified the need to provide increased assistance for people in recovery, particularly through holistic and community-based services. Wirral, North West England, has higher rates of drug misuse and hospital stays for alcohol-related harm compared to the England average, and the local Joint Strategic Needs Assessment identified that peer support, a longer-term recovery service and one-stop-shop for information would be beneficial for people in alcohol and drug recovery. The Wirral Drug and Alcohol Action Team developed The Quays, a peer-led drug and alcohol recovery project, in response to this evidence.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Wirral PCT
Summary references
Eckley, L., Timpson, H and Hughes, L.J. (2012). Evaluation of The Quays project, Wirral, Merseyside.
Website
Published reference(s)
Eckley, L., Timpson, H and Hughes, L.J. (2012). Evaluation of The Quays project, Wirral, Merseyside.
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Focal Point 2012/2013

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Supply and markets
Objectives
To provide a provision on a wide range of technical information on the UK drugs situation including an extensive annual report to the EMCDDA. To co-ordinate the UK component of a European early warning system on New Psychoactive Substances. To deliver an assembly of data on drug treatment across the UK in formats required by the EMCDDA.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology, Pharmacology
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Initial identified needs
Every Member State of the EU is required, under an EU Regulation, to have a National Focal Point on Drugs. The Focal Points’s role is to be the national partner for the United Kingdom and are required to report information on the national drug situation to the European Monitoring Centre on Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA).
Performed by
The Centre for Public Health
Funded by
Department of Health
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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GABAA receptors in acumbens neural circuits underlying drug abuse: novel targets for treatment

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Determinants of drug use, Consequences of drug use, Mechanism of drug use and effects
Objectives
To discover the roles of GABAergic systems in the accumbens in the neurobiology of drug addictions
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Neurosciences, Psychology, Pharmacology
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Initial identified needs
The neurobiology of addictions is inadequately understood, and little attention has been paid to neurotransmission using the inhibitory transmitter GABA
Performed by
University of Sussex
University of Dundee
Funded by
Medical research council
Summary references
Website
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/psychology/research/behaviouralclinicalneuroscience/gabaproject
Published reference(s)
Dixon et al, Proc Natl Acad USA (2010) 107: 2289-2294 Panzanelli et al, J Physiol (2011) 589: 4959-80 Wlodarczyk et al, J Neurosci (2013) 3905-394 Dixon et al, PLos One (2012) 7: e47135
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Incidence, prevalence, harms and intervention effects for problem and injecting drug use: crime, morbidity & mortality

Incidence, prevalence, harms and intervention effects for problem and injecting drug use: crime, morbidity & mortality
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
-
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Determinants of drug use
Objectives
Our research will combine, and then compare, different sorts of information about serious drug problems to get a more exact idea of how many people are involved, how many get involved in crime, what proportion die, and how helpful treatment has been in reducing death and crime.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Research combines and compares treatment records and criminal records to better estimate how many people are involved in serious drug use, how many get involved in crime, what proportion die, and how helpful treatment has been in reducing death and crime. Using advanced statistical techniques, Miller et al will examine all of the available sources of information about drug misuse and bring these together to provide the Home Office with much better estimates to inform the Government’s drug strategy.
Performed by
The University of Manchester
Funded by
Medical Research Council
Summary references
http://www.mrc.ac.uk/ResearchPortfolio/Grant/Record.htm?GrantRef=G1000021&CaseId=16828
Website
Published reference(s)
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Interventions for alcohol and drug misuse in acute settings: a systematic review

Interventions for alcohol and drug misuse in acute settings: a systematic review
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
-
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
This systematic review will evaluate the effectiveness of interventions used for the misuse of alcohol and / or drugs by patients identified in acute hospital settings. It is part of an overarching programme of work to investigate methods of improving the physical and mental health of those misusing alcohol or illicit drugs being carried out under the Physical Health and Addiction Theme of the NIHR CLAHRC for Leeds, York and Bradford.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
The misuse of alcohol and illicit drugs has a major impact on population health and on NHS costs. Alcohol-related hospital admissions have risen by 69% from 2002 to 2007/8 and now stand close to 900,000. Treating the effects of alcohol misuse is estimated to cost the NHS up to 2.7 billion per year. Over 42,000 hospital admissions with a primary or secondary diagnosis of drug misuse were reported in 2008/09 and the NHS costs of Class A drug use (excluding specialist treatment) were estimated to be nearly £400 million in 2003/4. Many substance users will at some time suffer physical ill-health and present within the acute hospital setting. This provides an opportunity to deliver interventions that not only have the potential to improve health but also reduce the burden on the NHS.
Performed by
Centre for Reviews and Dissemination
Department of Health Sciences, University of York
Funded by
Commissioned by the NIHR CLAHRC
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Making drug policy better: governance and implementation issues in drug policy-making

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Objectives
To consider the governance of drug policy in the UK, that is the way in which drug policy is made and implemented, in order to identify weaknesses in the current mechanisms and make recommendations for improvement in order to increase the effectiveness of drug policy.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Political sciences, Sociology, Other discipline
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Initial identified needs
There is considerable dissatisfaction about UK drug policy among researchers, policy-makers, practitioners and the general public and repeated reviews raise the same issues concerning effectiveness and the evidence underpinning policy and practice. At the same time there are major changes both in the types of drugs causing problems and modes of supply. However, little seems to change and policy is perceived as "stuck". Alongside this the delivery landscape is changing dramatically with the moves to greater localism in a period of financial austerity. While a lot of the debate and research in the drug policy field is focused on the content of policy and the types of interventions adopted less attention has been paid to how drug policy is made and implemented and the mechanisms, processes and stakeholders involved. This research aims to address these issues.
Performed by
UK Drug Policy Commission
Funded by
Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, Barclays plc
Summary references
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/how-to-make-drug-policy-better/ http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/charting-new-waters/
Website
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/
Published reference(s)
UKDPC (2012) How to make drug policy better: key findings from UKDPC research into drug policy governance. London: UKDPC. Hamilton, L., Rubin, J., & singleton N. (2012) Characteristics of good governance for drug policy: findings from an expert consultation. London: UKDPC. MacGregor, S., McKeganey, N., Monaghan, M. & Roberts, M. (2012) Essays on the governance of drug policy. London: UKDPC. Rutter, J. (2012) Lessons on policy governance: what drug policy can learn from other policy areas. London: UKDPC. UKDPC (2012) Charting New Waters: Delivering drug policy at a time of radical reform and financial austerity. London: UKDPC http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/charting-new-waters-delivering-drug-policy-at-a-time-of-radical-reform-and-financial-austerity.pdf UKDPC (2012) Domino effects: the impact of localism and austerity on services for young people and on drug problems. London: UKDPC Roberts, M. (2011) By their fruits...Applying payment by results to drugs recovery. London: UKDPC.
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Mapping and Exploration of Drug Markets in the City of Plymouth

Mapping and Exploration of Drug Markets in the City of Plymouth
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Law enforcement responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use, Supply and markets, Methodology issues
Objectives
1. To map Plymouth drug markets 2. To assess the risks present that relate to drug supply 3. To provide recommendations to reduce risk and harm related to drug supply and the responses to it
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Criminology, Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The need to assess drug use risks in relation to the different drug markets present
Performed by
Drug and Alcohol Research Unit, Plymouth University
Funded by
Drug and Alcohol Action Team, Plymouth, Devon & Cornwall Police
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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National Drug Treatment Monitoring System (NDTMS) 2012/2013

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
To ensure the effectiveness and relevance of: • Commission and deliver services in a competent, ethical and professional manner, embracing ‘best practice’; • Continue to place strong emphasis on understanding the objectives of the partnership – building from that understanding a better partnership and better solutions. • Accept shared responsibility for and participate constructively in the monitoring and review processes. • Notify each other as soon as possible of any major concerns, issues or opportunities relating to the services provided. • Proactively seek, acknowledge and consider professional advice given by either partner • Treat in confidence information obtained or provided in the course of discussions and the on-going service and monitoring of this Agreement. • Communicate the details of this Agreement to all parties involved to help ensure continuous improvement in the commissioning or delivery of services.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Performed by
The Centre for Publich Health
The National Treatment Agency
Funded by
National Treatment Agency (NTA)
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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National and Local Prevalence Estimates for England

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
Estimates of the prevalence of opiate use, crack cocaine use and drug injecting
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Need for estimates of the prevalence of opiate and / or crack cocaine use and drug injecting
Performed by
National Drug Evidence Centre, University of Manchester
Funded by
National Treatment Agency for Substance Use
Summary references
http://www.nta.nhs.uk/facts-prevalence.aspx
Website
Published reference(s)
http://www.nta.nhs.uk/facts-prevalence.aspx
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New drugs for addiction: focus on attenuating core behavioural components of heroin, cocaine and alcohol addiction and relapse prevention

New drugs for addiction: focus on attenuating core behavioural components of heroin, cocaine and alcohol addiction and relapse prevention
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Harm reduction responses, Determinants of drug use
Objectives
We seek to identify rational potential targets for drug development based upon our understanding of the pharmacology and brain processes engaged in addiction, rather than a random shotgun approach. The ICCAM cluster has identified multiple potential therapeutic drugs that may be of use in the treatment of addiction and now seeks to develop a platform to rapidly assess their efficacy in humans. The word platform means that we will adopt a common research approach based at each of our three sites to study the effects of particular drugs in human participants on processes that are relevant to addiction. We will use state of the art brain imaging techniques to study the effect of drugs on brain activity while a person responds to rewards, for example. These will be combined with neuropsychological assessment and monitoring of clinical outcomes to develop our research capacity.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Neurosciences, Psychology, Pharmacology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
This application brings two highly successful academic groups together with an industrial stakeholder, GSK. An experimental medicine platform will be used to assess candidate brain systems underpinning relapse at a molecular, network and behavioural level by assessing three candidate mechanisms based on dopamine DRD3 receptors (for relapse prevention), μ-opioid receptors (which mediate the reinforcing effects of opioids) and NK1 receptors (implicated in both stress and reward responses). The platform will then be available to study other candidate treatment approaches for addiction that may include for example orexin antagonists and appetite regulating peptides.
Performed by
Imperial College London
University of Cambridge
Funded by
Medical Research Council
Summary references
http://www.mrc.ac.uk/ResearchPortfolio/Grant/Record.htm?GrantRef=G1000018&CaseId=16825
Website
Published reference(s)
Although every reasonable effort is made to present accurate information, ERANID makes no guarantees of any kind and cannot be held liable for any incorrect information or external hyperlinks.

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