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Searching information on drug research projects

This database contains information gathered in the course of the ERANID project during 2013 and 2014. Principally, it contains details of research projects on illicit drugs carried out since 2010 within the six ERANID countries and funded by the European Committee: Belgium; France; Italy; Portugal; The Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. However, this database will not capture all illicit drugs research carried out within a country.

62 projects matched the selected criteria:

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North West Public Health Observatory (NWPHO)

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses, Treatment responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
The primary goals of the PHO are to: • Analyse information and data to produce meaningful health intelligence. • Work in partnership with practitioners, government, health and academic organisations at a local and national level. • Monitor and forecast trends in health status and disease and play a major role in showing how health inequalities are being tackled locally and regionally.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
The purpose of the PHOs is to produce information, data and intelligence on people’s health and health care for practitioners, commissioners, policy makers and the wider community. They turn information and data into meaningful health intelligence on topics such as: • Alcohol • Cancer • Cardio Vascular Disease • Crime and Violence • Diabetes • Drug Misuse • End of Life • Ethnic Minority Health • Health Inequalities • Learning Disabilities • Mental Health • Obesity • Offender health • Older People • Renel Disease • Sexual Health • Stroke • Teenage Pregnancy • Tobacco
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Department of Health
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Opiate Substitute Therapy

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses
Objectives
The aim of this research is to better understand outcomes for patients receiving opiate substitute therapy and to identify what factors are associated with successful outcomes.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
The possibility of developing a model to predict the characteristics of patients who have successful treatment outcomes will be explored.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health
Funded by
University of Liverpool
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Optimal provision of needle and syringe programmes for injecting drug users: A systematic review.

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2008
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
The review sought to determine which approaches to the organisation and delivery of NSPs for IDUs are effective by addressing three research questions: (1) What types of NSPs are effective? (2) Which additional harm reduction services offered by NSPs are effective? and (3) Are NSPs delivered in parallel with, or alongside, opiate substitution therapy (OST) effective? In examining which types of NSPs were effective, the following organisational characteristics of services were considered: provider, site and setting of services; availability and accessibility; geographical setting; type of injecting equipment supplied; and return policies on used equipment.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
The introduction of needle and syringe programmes (NSPs) during the 1980s is credited with averting an HIV epidemic in the United Kingdom and Australia, but hepatitis C (HCV) incidence continues to rise among injecting drug users (IDUs). NSPs incorporating additional harm reduction strategies have been highlighted as an approach that may impact on HCV incidence. This systematic review sought to determine which approaches to the organisation and delivery of NSPs are effective.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
NICE
Summary references
Jones L, Pickering L, Sumnall H, McVeigh J, Bellis MA. Optimal provision of needle and syringe programmes for injecting drug users: A systematic review. Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Sep;21(5):335-42.
Website
Published reference(s)
Jones L, Pickering L, Sumnall H, McVeigh J, Bellis MA. Optimal provision of needle and syringe programmes for injecting drug users: A systematic review. Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Sep;21(5):335-42.
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Part one: To update the reviews of the evidence for the optimal provision of needle and syringe programmes.

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
For the review of quantitative evidence, the following key research questions were addressed: 1. What level of coverage of needles, syringes and other types of injecting equipment are most effective and cost-effective for reducing the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C infection among people who inject opiates and stimulants? 2. What types of NSPs are effective and cost-effective for reducing the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C and other BBVs, and morbidity and mortality relating to injecting drug use among people who inject opiates and stimulants? 3. Which additional harm reduction services offered by NSPs are effective and cost-effective for reducing the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C and other BBVs, and morbidity and mortality relating to injecting drug use among people who inject opiates and stimulants? 4. Whether NSPs delivered in parallel with, or alongside, services that provide opiate substitution therapy (OST) are more effective and cost-effective than alternative service configurations? For the review of qualitative evidence, the key research questions were, among people who inject opiates and stimulants and practitioners involved in their care: 1. What do they identify as suitable types of NSPs, and what do they believe to be a suitable level of coverage of needles, syringes and other types of injecting equipment? 2. What are their views and perspectives on, and experiences of, different types of NSPs? 3. What are their views and perspectives on, and experiences of, additional harm reduction services offered by NSPs? 4. What are their views and perspectives on, and experiences of, OST delivered in parallel or alongside NSPs.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
This review was undertaken to support the update of guidance on the optimal provision of needle and syringe programmes (NSPs). We adopted a broad perspective on the evidence examined, seeking to incorporate qualitative and quantitative evidence, examine successes and barriers to implementation, and assess the applicability and transferability of new evidence, with a particular efforts to locate evidence relating to drop boxes, outreach schemes and vending machines.
Performed by
The Centre for Public Health
Funded by
NICE
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Part two: To review the evidence on the provision of NSPs to PIED users.

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Harm reduction responses
Objectives
The purpose of the review was to examine the evidence regarding the optimal provision of NSP for reducing the prevalence of blood borne viruses (BBVs) and morbidity and mortality relating to injecting drug use for people who PIEDs. The review aimed to examine effectiveness and cost-effectiveness data and views and perspectives regarding: • The level of coverage of needles, syringes and other injecting equipment • Types of NSP that are effective and cost-effective • Additional harm reduction services offered by NSP
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
Needle and syringe programmes (NSP) in England are based across a range of services including specialist services, pharmacies, outreach/mobile services, custody suites and A&E departments. In the UK, people who inject performance and image enhancing drugs (PIEDs), including steroids, growth hormone and other novel drugs, are believed to represent a significant and increasing proportion of all NSP users. PIED users are likely to have very different needs than other injecting drug users (IDUs). Following a review by NICE of NICE guidance on the optimal provision of NSP first issued in 2009 (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2009), it was concluded that guidance regarding NSP provision for PIED users was required.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health
Funded by
NICE
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Post-discharge audit

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
To better understand what happens to people who drop out of treatment. As a consequence of making contact, we would also hope to encourage re-integration of clients back to treatment.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
Rationale is to better understand what happens to people who leave drug treatment in an unplanned way by attempting to follow them up six months after they leave. A third of people who leave drug treatment leave in an unplanned way and do not return and we need to establish what is happening in these cases.
Performed by
Alcohol and Drugs Team, Public Health England
Addaction
Funded by
Public Health England
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Prevalence of, and risk factors for, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections among men who inject image- and performance-enhancing drugs in England & Wales

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2011
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
To idenify the health related risks associated with injecting image and performance enhancing drug (IPED) users in the England and Wales.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography
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Initial identified needs
People who inject drugs’ vulnerability to infection is widely recognised; however, studies have rarely focused on image and performance enhancing drug (IPED) use. IPEDs, such as anabolic steroids, are used for cosmetic and aesthetic reasons, as well as to improve athletic performance. In the United Kingdom, Needle and Syringe Programme (NSP) use by IPED injectors has grown substantially, and in many areas the majority of NSPs users are now IPED injectors.
Performed by
Center for Publich Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Public Health England, Viv Hope
Summary references
Hope. V., McVeigh. J., Marongiu. A, et al (2013). Prevalence of, and risk factors for, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections among men who inject image- and performance-enhancing drugs in England & Wales. HIV Medicine, 14 (S2), 2.
Website
Published reference(s)
Hope. V., McVeigh. J., Marongiu. A, et al (2013). Prevalence of, and risk factors for, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections among men who inject image- and performance-enhancing drugs in England & Wales. HIV Medicine, 14 (S2), 2.
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Survey of Smoking, Drinking & Drug Use among Young People in England

Survey of Smoking, Drinking & Drug Use among Young People in England
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
Data from the survey series are widely used to inform policy in these key areas of public health policy.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Psychology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The SDD survey is the primary source of statistics on smoking, drinking alcohol and illegal drug use among 11 to 15 year olds in England, with trends back to 1982.
Performed by
Department of Education
Home Office
HSCIC
Funded by
Summary references
http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB11334
Website
Published reference(s)
http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB11334
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The impact of exercise referral for people aged 40 and over in drug addiction services

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2013
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses
Objectives
Aim of the project (funded through Flexibility and Sustainability Funding): to evaluate our pilot study of exercise referral for older drug users (defined as aged 40 and over [EMCDDA, 2010; NTA, 2010]) and further develop this into a feasibility trial. Objectives of the project:  To analyse the quantitative and qualitative data arising from our pilot.  To conduct interviews with the exercise referral gym instructors who delivered our pilot and analyse these data.  To develop a theory driven intervention for behaviour change as an adjunct to exercise referral.  To revise and develop the methodology of the feasibility trial.  To submit a funding application to NIHR Research for Patient Benefit (January 2013) for the feasibility trial. Aim of the feasibility trial (funded through NIHR Research for Patient Benefit): to determine the feasibility and optimum intervention design of exercise referral to improve the health of older drug users. Objective of the feasibility trial: to conduct a randomised single blind trial among people in contact with drug addiction services aged 40 and over in order to assess the feasibility of using exercise referral to improve fitness, mental health and quality of life.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Preliminary findings from America and Norway have suggested that supporting drug users to participate in exercise has benefits on physical and mental health and may also reduce drug and alcohol use. The aim of our project is to ascertain if exercise referral, coupled with an intervention to support behaviour change, can be used to improve the health of older drug users in Liverpool.
Performed by
The Centre for Public Health
Funded by
Liverpool Health Inequalities Research Institute
Summary references
BMJ Open. 2013 May 28;3(5)
Website
Published reference(s)
Beynon CM, Luxton A, Whitaker R, Cable NT, Frith L, Taylor AH, Zou L, Angell P, Robinson S, Holland D, Holland S, Gabbay M (2013). Exercise referral for drug users aged 40 and over: results of a pilot study in the UK. BMJ Open. 28;3(5).
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Addressing stigma and discrimination towards recovering drug users

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2014
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Law enforcement responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
To raise awareness of the impact of stigma on recovery and reintegration for those experiencing drug problems and their families, to highlight key problem areas and to stimulate action to tackles this stigma.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Previous work undertaken by UKDPC has highlighted how stigma may impact on recovery from drug problems in many ways. Given the focus on increasing rates of recovery within drug policy in the UK it is important that this issue is recognised and addressed if policy is to be successful and the lives of individual drug users and their families improved.
Performed by
UK Drug Policy Commission
Funded by
Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Scottish Drug Recovery Consortium, Welsh Assembly Government
Summary references
UKDPC (2010) Getting Serious About Stigma: An Overview. London: UKDPC available at: http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/getting-serious-about-stigma-problem-stigmatising-drug-users/
Website
http://www.ukdpc.org.uk/publication/getting-serious-about-stigma-problem-stigmatising-drug-users/
Published reference(s)
Lloyd, C. (2010). Sinning and Sinned Against: The Stigmatisation of Problem Drug Users. London: UK Drug Policy Commission. Loughborough Communication Research Centre (LCRC) (2010). Representations of Drug Use and Drug Users in the British Press: A Content Analysis of Newspaper Coverage. London: UK Drug Policy Commission. Singleton, N. (2010). Attitudes to Drug Dependence: Results from a Survey of People Living in Private Households in the UK. London: UK Drug Policy Commission. UKDPC (2010) Getting Serious about Stigma: an overview. London: UKDPC UKDPC (2010) Getting Serious about Stigma in Scotland. London: UKDPC
Although every reasonable effort is made to present accurate information, ERANID makes no guarantees of any kind and cannot be held liable for any incorrect information or external hyperlinks.

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