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Searching information on drug research projects

This database contains information gathered in the course of the ERANID project during 2013 and 2014. Principally, it contains details of research projects on illicit drugs carried out since 2010 within the six ERANID countries and funded by the European Committee: Belgium; France; Italy; Portugal; The Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. However, this database will not capture all illicit drugs research carried out within a country.

62 projects matched the selected criteria:

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Alice Rap: Addictions and Lifestyles in Contemporary Europe. Work package : Stakeholder analysis

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2014
Area(s) of research
Treatment responses, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
Th contribute to cross national analysis and theory development on stakeholder involvement in drugs/ alcohol/other addictive behaviour policies.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Anthropology, Criminology, Political sciences, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Stakeholder issues are central to understanding the policy process and policy implementation. (This is a part of a larger study)
Performed by
Middlesex University UK
Aarhus University, Denmark
European Centre for Social Welfare and Policy, Vienna, Austria
Eclectica, Italy
Instytut Psychiatrii i Neurologii, Warsaw, Poland
Funded by
EU funds FP7
Summary references
see Alice rap website
Website
www.alicerap.eu
Published reference(s)
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Forensic Early Warning System

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2014
Area(s) of research
Law enforcement responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
To form a collaboration between the UK Forensic laboratories, standards companies, Government Organisations and Universities. To coordinate the purchase of chemical reference standards and to be pro-active in identifying NPS that are in the UK.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Other medical sciences
Read more…
Initial identified needs
To effectively and efficiently identify New Psychoactive Substances in the United Kingdom (UK).
Performed by
UK Home Office
Funded by
Summary references
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/98031/fews.pdf
Website
Published reference(s)
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The ConMan Programme - Service User Module

The ConMan Programme - Service User Module
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
-
Project ending year
2014
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses
Objectives
To develop a UK Evidence Base for Contingency Management in Addiction Treatment: Incentive-based interventions to improve treatments to reduce drug use and associated harms.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Contingency management (CM) has been developed in the US for use alongside OST (and physical healthcare, but less explored) in order to encourage better treatment outcomes. CM works by providing positive reinforcement (usually in the form of vouchers which a patient can exchange for goods and services consistent with a drug-free lifestyle) which are given to drug users when they achieve clearly defined changes in their behaviour (eg regular attendance at clinic, abstinence from use of street drugs, health checks, completion of vaccination). There is strong evidence from research in the US that CM can greatly improve the outcomes of existing treatments. As a result NICE has recently recommended that CM should be implemented in the UK (11,54). However, the UK has no track record of applying CM in drug treatment settings and it needs to be established whether the benefit seen in the USA can be replicated in the UK.
Performed by
Kings College London
Funded by
NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research
Summary references
http://england.ukcrn.org.uk/StudyDetail.aspx?StudyID=6116
Website
Published reference(s)
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The Glasgow Effect

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
2014
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
To gain a greater understanding of the impact of problem drug use on the ‘Scottish effect’ and ‘Glasgow effect’, this study aims to: • Assess the reliability and comparability of various drugs-related data sets available in Scotland and England (and specifically for the three cities of interest, Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester) • Model historical trends in problem drug use incidence and prevalence in Scotland, England, Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. • Model historical trends in the risk behaviour profile of the drug users in these areas. • Examine likely differences in drug-related mortality over time and across areas. • Model the potential of problem drug use to explain the emergence of the Scottish Effect and Glasgow Effect, and thereby assess the most appropriate policy responses.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Problem drug use is known to have a detrimental influence on health and social outcomes. A higher prevalence of problem drug use has been suggested as a causal factor in explaining the excess mortality in Scotland and, in particular, Glasgow. Although the prevalence of problem drug use is known to be higher in Scotland and Glasgow, it is not known when this difference emerged, why it persists, and how it may develop in future. The principal reason for these ‘unknowns’ relates to historical difficulties in drugs-related data sets: the calculation of the incidence and prevalence of problem drug use has been problematic because of geographical differences in service provision, differences in recording practices, and the transient and mobile nature of this population. However, recent innovation has used a variety of different data sources to estimate the incidence of problem drugs misuse for certain populations through time, and the use of age-cohorts can provide estimates of the size and distribution of the drug-using population which can inform different modelled scenarios for service planning.4 The use of these, and other, data and techniques can provide a greater understanding of the impact of drugs misuse in Scotland compared to elsewhere in the UK. This information is required not only in relation to issues around service provision and planning, but also potentially to achieve reductions in the excess mortality currently experienced by Scottish (and especially Glasgow) populations.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health
Funded by
Glasgow Centre for Population Health
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Surveillance and Auditing of Avoidable Deaths in Cumbria

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2012
Project ending year
2015
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
1. To develop and set up a system for monitoring and surveillance of avoidable deaths (under 65 years) in Cumbria for a 3 year period, commencing April 2012 until March 2015. 2. To maintain surveillance system and data entry for duration of project. 3. To identify trends and analysis of the data collected. 4. To liaise with stakeholders to audit cases; identifying learning and development of action plans to prevent avoidable deaths across Cumbria. 5. To evaluate the impact of project in reducing avoidable deaths in Cumbria.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
To develop and host a system for monitoring and surveillance of all avoidable deaths in Cumbria over a 3 year period commencing April 2012 until March 2015. To provide a research nurse to maintain the system and utilise the information to work with NHS Cumbria and partners to audit cases and implement interventions to reduce and prevent avoidable deaths (under 65 years).
Performed by
The Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
NHS Cumbria Trust Headquarters
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Drug Use in Ireland and Northern Ireland

Drug Use in Ireland and Northern Ireland
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2002
Project ending year
-
Area(s) of research
Determinants of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
To obtain data in relation to lifetime (ever used), last year (recent use) and last month (current) of drug use in Northern Ireland, thanks to an on-going survey carried out every 4 years which commenced in 2002/03
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Other discipline
Read more…
Objectives (native)
To obtain data in relation to lifetime (ever used), last year (recent use) and last month (current) of drug use in Northern Ireland.
Initial identified needs
To look at drug prevalence rates in Northern Ireland for specified illegal drugs and prescription drugs
Performed by
DHSSP, Department of Health Social Services and Public Safety (Northern Ireland)
National Advisory Committee on Drugs, Dublin, Ireland
Funded by
DHSSPS (Department of Health, Social Security and Public Safety) – Northern Ireland, NACD (National Advisory Committee on Drugs) – Republic of Ireland
Summary references
http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/index/stats_research/stats-public-health/stats-drug-alcohol.htm
Website
http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/bulletin_1-_ni_prevalence_rates.pdf http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/bulletin_2.pdf http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/bulletin_6_-_sedatives_or_tranquillisers_and_anti-depressants.pdf
Published reference(s)
http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/bulletin_1-_ni_prevalence_rates.pdf http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/bulletin_2.pdf http://www.dhsspsni.gov.uk/bulletin_6_-_sedatives_or_tranquillisers_and_anti-depressants.pdf
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Internet Tools for Research in Europe on New Drugs (I-TREND): interdisciplinary and integrated approaches to substances, users and markets

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
-
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Mechanism of drug use and effects, Supply and markets
Objectives
The final goal of this project is to contribute to preventing emerging health and social risks linked to new psychoactive substances (NPS) sold on the internet. Final recipients of this project are harm reduction and health professionals in contact with potential users of new substances. Main findings will be intended to respond to emerging risks related to new psychoactive substances. The main objective of the project is to provide experts involved in risk assessment procedures on NPS and forensic laboratories with a sustainable observation tool for interdisciplinary research on drugs. At the end of the project, the usefulness of such an observation tool will be assessed and findings will be disseminated. This tool is intended to help interdisciplinary research teams to identify and monitor new trends and patterns in the consumption of NPS. Specific objectives are the following: Reinforcing capacity for early identification on the internet of new molecules but also profiles of NPS’ users, their representations on toxicity of new drugs and patters of consumption. Checking availability of NPS and identifying marketing strategies applied to drug retail business. Reducing potential costs on toxicological analysis by avoiding unnecessary or duplicate analyses by laboratories and sharing data on toxicity. Selecting an accurate and sound “Top Ten NPS” which will lead to increased awareness on evidence-based health and social risks. User forums and online retail sites will be studied and an online survey will be conducted to collect and analyze qualitative and quantitative data. Toxicological analysis of collected samples will also be performed with reference standards to complement and assess the validity of data obtained from users and online shops.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology, Pharmacology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
To help prevent health and social harms linked to new psychoactive substances (NPS) and to focus on informing the response to emerging risks. A huge number of NPS can potentially be produced and marketed as legal highs, yet only a limited number are marketed online at a given time. Public agencies need to calibrate responses and to be able to determine on which substances to focus their efforts and when. I-Trend will encourage the most effective use of scarce resources. The internet is a necessary data source for observation of NPS markets. Qualitative analysis on user forums is carried out, online shops are monitored and an online survey is administered in participating countries, yielding comparable data across countries, triangulated with field data. Regarding toxicological and biological analysis of NPS, existing databases on new drugs do not yet respond to NPS identification and quantification needs. Collecting and analyzing reference standards and samples in a network is expected to produce new results while rationalizing work and to up-scale specific methods and protocols.
Performed by
French Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (OFDT, France)
Funded by
EC-DPIP
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Steroid and Image Enhancing Drugs Programme

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2013
Project ending year
-
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
To develop, in conjunction with HPA, HPS and UK academic leads, a UK-wide research programme to describe the epidemiology nature of steroid and image enhancing drug (SIEDs) use in Wales and across the UK, and provide a profile of harms associated with use over time including chronic infection with blood borne viruses. To undertake completion and maintenance of the dedicated website – www.siedsinfo.co.uk
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Objectives (native)
• To develop, in conjunction with HPA, HPS and UK academic leads, a UK-wide research programme to describe the epidemiology nature of steroid and image enhancing drug (SIEDs) use in Wales and across the UK, and provide a profile of harms associated with use over time including chronic infection with blood borne viruses. • To undertake completion and maintenance of the dedicated website – www.siedsinfo.co.uk
Initial identified needs
Over the last few decades, the use of Steroids and Image Enhancing Drugs (SIEDs) has become more widespread. Alongside this increase in use, there has been an associated rise in the number of infections and complications associated with SIEDs use. This project, aims to provide reliable and evidence based information and advice to reduce the harms associated with use.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Public Health Wales NHS Trust
Summary references
Website
www.siedsinfo.co.uk
Published reference(s)
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DIP Monitoring 2012/2013

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
-
Project ending year
-
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Harm reduction responses
Objectives
To produce monthly reports outlining performance, details outcomes such as treatment attendance, reasons for case closures and representation and continues to work with DIP teams to ensure that data quality is high.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Objectives (native)
• To produce monthly reports outlining performance, details outcomes such as treatment attendance, reasons for case closures and representation and continues to work with DIP teams to ensure that data quality is high.
Initial identified needs
Providing performance management, data processing and analysis regarding the delivery of Drug Intervention Programmes (DIP), to ensure that the delivery of DIP has been accurately represented and commissioners have been provided with a variety of information to assist their understanding of the DIP client group and the impact of the scheme.
Initial identified needs (native)
• Providing performance management, data processing and analysis regarding the delivery of Drug Intervention Programmes (DIP), to ensure that the delivery of DIP has been accurately represented and commissioners have been provided with a variety of information to assist their understanding of the DIP client group and the impact of the scheme.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Cheshire & Merseyside PCTs
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
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Data linking with PHE

Data linking with PHE
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
-
Project ending year
-
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
The intention is to link information held by the DWP to the NDTMS for the purpose of understanding the interaction of identified drug misusers’ with the benefits and drug treatment system. The data will be anonymised abd held by Public Health England to be used for research and analysis.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
The DWP and the Public Health England are currently working on a project to link data on benefit claimants and PDUs in treatment. The DWP holds data on customers who have been identified as drug misusers, who are in treatment or not in treatment. PHE hold specialist treatment data relating to certain drug misusers on the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System (“NDTMS”).
Performed by
Department for Work and Pensions
Funded by
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
Although every reasonable effort is made to present accurate information, ERANID makes no guarantees of any kind and cannot be held liable for any incorrect information or external hyperlinks.

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