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Searching information on drug research projects

This database contains information gathered in the course of the ERANID project during 2013 and 2014. Principally, it contains details of research projects on illicit drugs carried out since 2010 within the six ERANID countries and funded by the European Committee: Belgium; France; Italy; Portugal; The Netherlands; and the United Kingdom. However, this database will not capture all illicit drugs research carried out within a country.

62 projects matched the selected criteria:

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Dedicated Drugs Court Feasibility Study

Dedicated Drugs Court Feasibility Study
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
The DDC model was piloted at six magistrates’ courts: Leeds, West London, Barnsley, Bristol, Cardiff and Salford. The model aimed to: • improve the processes and effectiveness of the magistrates’ courts in dealing with drug-misusing offenders; and • reduce drug use and reoffending.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
The study aimed to establish whether a robust impact evaluation of the Dedicated Drug Court (DDC) pilot would be possible and, if so, the requirements for such an evaluation. An impact evaluation would provide an assessment of whether the DDC pilot makes any difference to outcomes, by looking at what happens to those who go through the DDC, compared to what would have happened had they not. The impact is the difference between the two. This would be of use in helping the MoJ determine whether it was possible to measure the impact of the DDC pilot. This in turn would help with decisions on whether to roll out the pilot more widely.
Performed by
HMCS
MOJ
Funded by
Summary references
http://www.icpr.org.uk/media/5566/Feasability%20of%20dedicated%20drug%20court%20pilot.pdf
Website
Published reference(s)
http://www.icpr.org.uk/media/5566/Feasability%20of%20dedicated%20drug%20court%20pilot.pdf
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Dedicated Drugs Court Process Evaluation

Dedicated Drugs Court Process Evaluation
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use
Objectives
The process study had two aims. Firstly, to map the implementation, operation and core elements of the DDC model. This included identifying and exploring any variations between the model operating at the six different DDC sites in England and Wales. The second aim was to identify the factors affecting the perceived impact of the DDC model by exploring the influences that underpinned its potential to reduce drug use and associated offending.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
Evaluation to explore current delivery of the DDC pilots. Six pilot Dedicated Drug Courts (DDCs) that specialised in dealing with offenders who misused drugs were introduced in magistrates’ courts in England and Wales from 2004.This process evaluation of the pilot Dedicated Drug Courts used both qualitative and quantitative methods to map the implementation of the DDC model and the factors underpinning the DDCs’ potential to reduce drug use and associated offending.
Performed by
HMCS
MoJ
Funded by
Summary references
http://www.natcen.ac.uk/media/667858/dedicated%20drugs%20report.pdf
Website
Published reference(s)
http://www.natcen.ac.uk/media/667858/dedicated%20drugs%20report.pdf
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Estimating the numbers of children of problematic drug users and their residential circumstances to inform United Kingdom

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
This study aimed to assess the use of the DIP and the NDTMS monitoring systems to estimate the number of children of PDU in an area of the UK. Accurate estimates of this sort are critical in order to appropriately plan service delivery and assess the potential burden on social care services and family members.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
Research has shown that children of problematic drug users (PDU), defined as those using opiates and/or crack cocaine (Home Office, 2008), are at an increased risk of developing a range of negative social, psychological and developmental outcomes, including problematic drug and alcohol use and are at an increased risk of physical harm.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
DAATS, C&M
Summary references
Duffy. P, Shaw. C, Woolfall. K, Beynon. C. Estimating the numbers of children of problematic drug users and their residential circumstances to inform United Kingdom. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy. 17 (5), 470-84, 2010.
Website
Published reference(s)
Duffy. P, Shaw. C, Woolfall. K, Beynon. C. Estimating the numbers of children of problematic drug users and their residential circumstances to inform United Kingdom. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy. 17 (5), 470-84, 2010.
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European drug prevention quality standards

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2008
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses
Objectives
This publication will help steer efforts in the right direction. Using an empirically derived reference framework, it bridges the gaps between science, policy and practice. Based on an overview of existing standards in Europe and beyond, a number of highly respected experts from EU Member States and international organisations worked together to prepare the publication. In this series, information, advice, and guidance are offered to professionals and practitioners. Well structured and with many useful tables and figures, this publication will help its users as they progress from a first needs assessment to the delivery of an intervention and its final evaluation. Correct implementation of prevention measures with evidence-based components and anchoring them within existing structures and services (or activities) is key to ensuring effectiveness and it helps to avoid unintended iatrogenic effects. This manual will provide valuable guidance in this respect and allow preventive interventions to reach their full potential.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
European Union (EU) policy, such as the EU drugs action plans for 2005–08 and 2009–12, has expressed an intention to develop and implement best practice in drug prevention, but so far has not been able to provide a reference framework on how to do this. Guidance on drug prevention interventions is available in some Member States of the EU, but it varies in terms of its content, methodological rigour, and its applicability to the wider European context. In response to this situation, this project aimed to provide a commonly agreed reference framework that could help improve the state of drug prevention in the EU.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
European Commission
Summary references
Brotherhood, A and Sumnall, H (2011). European drug prevention quality standards. A manual for prevention professionals, EMCDDA.
Website
www.cph.org. uk/drugprevention/
Published reference(s)
Brotherhood, A and Sumnall, H (2011). European drug prevention quality standards. A manual for prevention professionals, EMCDDA.
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Experiences of drug use and ageing: Health, quality of life, relationships and service implications.

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken using semi-structured interviews with prompts. The aim of the study was to explore older people’s experiences of substance use in the context of ageing, and its impact on health, quality of life, relationships and service use.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
Use of illicit drugs by older people is a neglected policy, research and service provision and is generally perceived as a lifestyle of younger populations. In the United Kingdom (UK), the proportion of problematic drug users aged 50 and above in contact with drug treatment services in Cheshire and Merseyside has increased statistically significantly. Problematic drug use is defined in the UK as use of opiates and/or crack cocaine (Home Office 2008). However, recent reviews suggest that services specifically for older people misusing drugs in the UK are not widely available or accessed by them, and that diagnosis of drug and substance misuse among this population is missed and access to services and treatment not provided.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Halton & St Helens Primary Care Trust
Summary references
Website
Published reference(s)
Roe B, Beynon C, Pickering L, Duffy P. Experiences of drug use and ageing: health, quality of life, relationship and service implications. J Adv Nurs. 2010 Sep;66(9):1968-79
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Meeting the Health Needs of Problematic Drug Users Through Community Pharmacy: A Qualitative Study

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2010
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Treatment responses, Mechanism of drug use and effects
Objectives
This paper aims to qualitatively explore the feasibility and desirability of further developing community pharmacy services to meet the wider health needs of problematic drug users.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography
Read more…
Initial identified needs
In the United Kingdom, users of illicit drugs exhibit worse overall health functioning than the population norm and often face barriers to accessing general health services exacerbating this health inequality. Community pharmacies are established service providers for problematic drug users (PDUs). PDUs have many unmet health needs, which pharmacists may be able to help resolve.
Performed by
Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Liverpool DAAT
Summary references
Mackridge. A,Beynon. C, McVeigh. J, Whitfield M, Chandler, M. Meeting the Health Needs of Problematic Drug Users Through Community Pharmacy: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Substance Use. 15 (6), 367-76, 2010.
Website
Published reference(s)
Mackridge. A,Beynon. C, McVeigh. J, Whitfield M, Chandler, M. Meeting the Health Needs of Problematic Drug Users Through Community Pharmacy: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Substance Use. 15 (6), 367-76, 2010.
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Modelling Sexual Healthcare for Substance Misusing Women

Modelling Sexual Healthcare for Substance Misusing Women
Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Prevention responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
A study to modelling sexual health services for substance misusing women comprising of 2 stages: 1 Identification of sexual health risks, history and service needs via questionnaire and interview 2. Informal modelling of services using guidelines and stage 1 date, and testing of the model through focus groups
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Epidemiology, Sociology
Read more…
Initial identified needs
A study to modelling sexual health services for substance misusing women comprising of 2 stages: 1 Identification of sexual health risks, history and service needs via questionnaire and interview 2. Informal modelling of services using guidelines and stage 1 date, and testing of the model through focus groups.
Performed by
Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Funded by
NIHR Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB)
Summary references
This study had 2 key aims, and corresponding stages. In stage one, the study sought to identify sexual health risks and morbidities, and sexual health service use among substance-misusing women. Women aged 18+, residing in Hastings and Rother and who had used illicit or illegal substances in the previous month were invited to participate. Women were recruited at Hastings NHS Substance Misuse Service and Crime Reduction Initiative, and from Seaview Health and Wellbeing Centre in St. Leonard's on Sea. A combination of survey data and in-depth interview data were collected concerning: •type and frequency of sexual health risks and morbidities •levels of sexual health service use •enablers and barriers to that use among SMW •user preferences concerning sexual health service delivery In stage two, the study sought to specify a model for optimal sexual healthcare delivery to substance misusing women. Using stage one findings and relevant policy documents a model was informally developed. This was then ‘tested’ on two panels of stakeholders to problem-solve difficult elements of the model, and to identify and resolve likely issues of feasibility and implementation.
Website
Published reference(s)
http://www.brighton.ac.uk/snm/research/areas/health-and-social-inequalities/projects/womens-health.php
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Patterns of Substance Use & Support Needs of Residents in Young People’s Hostels & Foyer Accommodation in Liverpool: Final Report June 2010

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The aim of this research was to identify the patterns of substance use amongst those residing in young persons’ hostels and foyer accommodation in Liverpool, and to explore explanations for these patterns and support needs in order to provide in depth understanding of the needs of this vulnerable group.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
Young people who are sleeping rough or residing in temporary accommodation (hostels, foyers or bed and breakfasts) are often considered to be a homogenous group and their substance use and support needs are generally not investigated discretely. This report presents findings from in-depth research investigating patterns of substance use and support needs of residents of young person specific hostel and foyer accommodation in Liverpool.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Comino Foundation
Summary references
Cole. C., Wooding. O., Russell. S., Hennessey. C and McVeigh, J. (2010). Patterns of Substance Use & Support Needs of Residents in Young People’s Hostels & Foyer Accommodation in Liverpool: Final Report June 2010. Center for Public Health Publications.
Website
Published reference(s)
Cole. C., Wooding. O., Russell. S., Hennessey. C and McVeigh, J. (2010). Patterns of Substance Use & Support Needs of Residents in Young People’s Hostels & Foyer Accommodation in Liverpool: Final Report June 2010. Center for Public Health Publications.
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Powder Cocaine & Problematic Drug Users: A comparative study of the characteristics of DIP clients in Merseyside (April 09 – March 10)

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Drug related crime responses, Harm reduction responses, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The main aim of this report was to compare the characteristics of two different Merseyside resident drug user groups - the powder cocaine group and the PDU group – assessed through DIP in Merseyside between April 09 and March 10.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology, Sociology
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Initial identified needs
This report examines the characteristics of the DIP clients from the two drug groups who were assessed by DIP in Merseyside in 09/10. Findings are presented for Merseyside as a whole and for each D(A)AT individually. The Drug Interventions Programme (DIP) is an initiative set up by the Home Office in 2003 with an overarching aim to break the cycle of drug misuse, crime and prison and as a result reduce acquisitive crime in communities within England and Wales.
Performed by
Centre for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Funded by
Summary references
Collins. P and Duffy. P. (2010) Powder Cocaine & Problematic Drug Users: A comparative study of the characteristics of DIP clients in Merseyside (April 09 – March 10). Center for Public Heath Publications.
Website
Published reference(s)
Collins. P and Duffy. P. (2010) Powder Cocaine & Problematic Drug Users: A comparative study of the characteristics of DIP clients in Merseyside (April 09 – March 10). Center for Public Heath Publications.
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Search Results for: Older and sicker: changing mortality of drug users in treatment in the North West of England.

Funding country
United Kingdom
Project starting year
2009
Project ending year
2010
Area(s) of research
Prevalence, incidence and patterns of drug use, Consequences of drug use
Objectives
The drug using population of the UK is ageing, the first aim of this study was to ascertain whether this demographic change is reflected in the age at which drug users in drug treatment are dying. The second aim was to ascertain whether there were differences in the causes of death by age; more specifically, whether there was a significant difference in the proportion of drug related deaths and non-drug related deaths comparing those aged less than 40 and those aged 40 and over. Finally, we relate these findings to policy developments which are currently occurring in the UK.
Scientific discipline(s) involved
Demography, Epidemiology
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Initial identified needs
In 2001, the Government of the United Kingdom (UK) initiated a plan to reduce the number of drug related deaths in response to concerns raised by the ACMD. Clearly these intentions are laudable, and reducing the number of drug related deaths continues to be a priority. However in the UK, the term ‘drug related death’ only includes those arising from acute drug toxicity and mental and behavioural disorders due to drug use. Drug related deaths constitute a minority of all deaths of drug users and only represent a proportion of all deaths related to drug use; deaths from conditions known to be associated with drug use, for example, hepatitis C, aspiration pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis and endocarditis, are excluded from official figures on drug related deaths. Preliminary investigations show that drug users dying from drug related deaths tend to be younger than those who die from other causes.
Performed by
Center for Public Health
Funded by
Summary references
Beynon C, McVeigh J, Hurst A, Marr A. Older and sicker: Changing mortality of drug users in treatment in the North West of England. Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Sep;21(5):429-31.
Website
Published reference(s)
Beynon C, McVeigh J, Hurst A, Marr A. Older and sicker: Changing mortality of drug users in treatment in the North West of England. Int J Drug Policy. 2010 Sep;21(5):429-31.
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